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Functional Movement Screen

Screening & Assessment

Functional Movement Screens Equal Healthier Athletes!

For as long as I can remember (and that’s been awhile), athlete’s waited in a long line for a quickie exam performed by the team physician and were cleared to participate in various sports and activities. From there, performance tests were administered to see who the real “great athletes” on the team were! These tests included those that sought to see how many pushups, sit-ups, chin-ups, how fast, how quick, how agile, how skilled, etc. You remember, right? The coaches drooling like Pavlov’s Dogs in response to the new talent they’d use to destroy rival opponents for the coming season.

That’s been the usual sequence of events previously. And this sequence to find
talent, in many cases, missed opportunities to also discover why some athletes, even the ones who tested highly, ended up injured during the season. Can injuries to athletes be avoided with the proper testing methods? Can games possibly be won or lost because of faulty testing methods? The answer is a resounding “YES.”

Dysfunctional movement patterns may cause cyclic injuries. Some of these injuries are minor and some are season ending. That’s where the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) comes in. The FMS was created by Gray Cook to identify movement pattern deficiencies that may lead to injury and lack of performance. The FMS consists of seven movements that reveal an “inside out” look of how the body moves in all three planes of motion (sagittal, frontal, transverse).

CHRIS ZUPPA   |   Times
SP_334566_ZUPP_Basketball_4
(St. Petersburg, 02/17/2011) Gibbs' Gary Simon (23) gets past Tarpon Springs' Christopher CJ Mackey (23) (spelling from Times roster). Gibbs High School plays Tarpon Springs High School for the Class 5A region quarterfinal at Gibbs High School. [CHRIS ZUPPA, Times]
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For as long as I can remember (and that’s been awhile), athlete’s waited in a long line for a quickie exam performed by the team physician and were cleared to participate in various sports and activities. From there, performance tests were administered to see who the real “great athletes” on the team were! These tests included those that sought to see how many pushups, sit-ups, chin-ups, how fast, how quick, how agile, how skilled, etc. You remember, right? The coaches drooling like Pavlov’s Dogs in response to the new talent they’d use to destroy rival opponents for the coming season.

That’s been the usual sequence of events previously. And this sequence to find
talent, in many cases, missed opportunities to also discover why some athletes, even the ones who tested highly, ended up injured during the season. Can injuries to athletes be avoided with the proper testing methods? Can games possibly be won or lost because of faulty testing methods? The answer is a resounding “YES.”

Dysfunctional movement patterns may cause cyclic injuries. Some of these injuries are minor and some are season ending. That’s where the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) comes in. The FMS was created by Gray Cook to identify movement pattern deficiencies that may lead to injury and lack of performance. The FMS consists of seven movements that reveal an “inside out” look of how the body moves in all three planes of motion (sagittal, frontal, transverse).

Trent Mitchell, MS, CSCS, is the co-owner of Mitchell Fitness Systems, Inc. in Torrance, CA., and author of “How to Unlock the Five Doors to Your Best Body: A Fitness Guide for the Serious Couch Potato”, is available for personal training and guest speaking engagements. To contact, call 310-961-2610 or email at info@fitnesscoach4u.com.